writer's block
 
So you want to write a memorymatte. Putting your feelings into words is way easier than you think.
 
Don’t Reinvent the Wheel
 
A love letter. Wedding vows and toasts. Birthday cards and bar mitzvah tributes. Retirement speeches. Commencement addresses. You likely have beautiful content already written and ready to go! The gift of a memorymatte is so incredibly easy when you pair the right photo with words you already have. It’s as simple as copy-paste-go!
 
Remember, Progress - NOT Perfection
 
Don’t let the great get in the way of the good. It can be so easy to get hung up on the perfect way to say something—but don’t leave those words unsaid just because you are afraid that they are not going to be good enough. The truth of the matter is that a memorymatte doesn’t have to be the greatest novel of all time. More than words, the memorymatte is a piece of art. Your recipient will be so touched by the gesture of you sharing your memories, feelings and sentiments—and the essence of that very personal expression is more powerful than any individual word.
 
Overcome Inertia! Work in the memorymatte Tool
 
If you're feeling stuck, go ahead and upload the text into the storyboarding tool and see your matte copy laid out in the preview window. The tangible nature of seeing your progress will likely get you unstuck—remember, momentum breeds momentum!
 
Use a Mind Mapping Technique
 
We know, it sounds intimidating—but it's really easy and it works! Mind mapping is an easy technique many writers use to breakthrough the clutter of their thoughts and establish a structure. There is no one way to mind map, start like this: Draw a map of your thoughts using images and symbols. Start in the center with an image of the topic, using at least 3 colors. Select key words, and begin to draw lines that connect to the image. The lines become thinner as they radiate out from the center. Use multiple colors throughout the mind map, for visual stimulation and also for encoding and use emphasis and show associations in mind map. This color-coded thought tree will help you see your thoughts and memories down on paper in a different way and help you to organize your thoughts into words.
 
Limit Your Writing Time
 
Don't put unnecessary pressure on yourself—a marathon writing session can often stop you in your tracks within moments of getting started. Chunk your writing time into fifteen minute increments that you can focus on or step away from and come back to it after a refreshing break. You’ll find that less time to work can often spike more creativity and flow. And help you get through to what you want to say faster than you thought!
 
Go for a Walk
 
It almost sounds too simple, but getting up and going for a run or walk before you write can totally help get the creative juices flowing. Change your environment and choose a place that inspires you: a park, the beach, the mountains. Listen to your favorite music, or perhaps a song that reminds you of the recipient and get moving! You might find that your eureka moment happens just like that.
 
Sleep on It
 
Don't rush it. All good writers put down their pens and leave it for a while before they turn in their final work. It always helps to look at your copy with fresh eyes one last time before you submit it—and a second pair of fresh eyes can help you spot errors or things you might have left out, too! You will be happy that you slept on it and got it right.